Forum: The Racing Rules of Sailing

Government marks which must be honored - marks or obstructions?

Jim Archer
Nationality: United States of America
When the SIs specify that certain government marks bound legs, while others must be honored / passed on their correct side but do not begin or end a leg, are these other bouys marks or obstructions? From the definition of "mark" it would seem that they are marks. "An object the sailing instructions require a boat to leave on a specified side.." It would also seem that if they are not mentioned in the SIs then they are no tmarks, but could be obstructions. Is this correct?
Created: 19-Jul-11 02:44

Comments

John Allan
Nationality: Australia
Certifications:
  • National Judge
  • Regional Race Officer
2
If the SI require boats to pass an object on a specified side it is a mark.

If an object fulfills the definition of obstruction it is an obstruction.

Obstruction An object that a boat could not pass without changing course substantially, if she were sailing directly towards it and one of her hull lengths from it.

Thus, for example, navigation tower structures and large buoys are obstructions to most boats.

If an obstruction is also a mark, unless it is a continuing obstruction, rule 19 does not apply and rule 18 does (rule 19.1a)  If a mark is a continuing obstruction rule 19 applies and rule 18 does not (rule 19.1 last sentence)
Created: 19-Jul-11 10:31
Ant Davey
Nationality: United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Certifications:
  • National Judge
  • International Judge
  • Umpire In Training
0
They are marks.  Passing rather than rounding, but still marks.  
Unless there are two or more that have to be passed on the same side.  Then you can use them to define an exclusion zone in the SIs.  Then that zone becomes an obstruction.
If they are not mentioned in the SIs and there is no reference to government regulations or IRPCAS in the SIs either, then a protest committee would have a hard time enforcing them.
Created: 19-Jul-11 15:39
Tim Hohmann
Nationality: United States of America
Certifications:
  • Judge In Training
0
But I don't think two passing marks create an "exclusion zone" obstruction unless the SIs define it to be an obstruction (in which case rule 19 kicks in at the obstruction, and boats can be protested for sailing into the excluded area). 

Otherwise a boat must pass the marks on the correct side but otherwise can sail where she pleases.
Created: 19-Jul-11 18:40
P
Angelo Guarino
Nationality: United States of America
Certifications:
  • Judge In Training
  • Fleet Measurer
0
Tim, I hunted for a past thread we had here, but couldn't find it ... where we discussed Gov't exclusions vs SI exclusions.  As I recall, the discussion was based on the offshore water-intake "cribs" (structures) in Lake Michigan and the ring of stand-off marks surrounding them.

If anyone remembers that thread and can put their fingers on it, please post a link here.  Thanks.  Ang
Created: 19-Jul-12 02:40
Jim Archer
Nationality: United States of America
0
In the case of government navigation bouys not mentioned in the SIs which protect rocks or shallows, I presume it's not the bouy thats an obstruction but the rocks or shallows, right?
Created: 19-Jul-12 03:38
John Allan
Nationality: Australia
Certifications:
  • National Judge
  • Regional Race Officer
0
If a navigation buoy is big enough to meet the definition of an obstruction it is an obstruction.
Created: 19-Jul-12 04:43
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